LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (1962)

The Unenthusiastic Critic Podcast - Episode 35

The Unenthusiastic Critic is taking no prisoners, as we sit down to discuss her first viewing of Lawrence of Arabia (1962).

We were fortunate enough to catch a big-screen, 70mm showing of David Lean's four-hour, Oscar-winning epic about British soldier and diplomat T.E. Lawrence. Can the visual grandeur, political insight, and emotional complexity of Lean's masterpiece possibly overcome Nakea's distaste for extremely long films?

Nothing is written...until The Unenthusiastic Critic writes it.

Program

0:00: Prologue: from Lawrence of Arabia
0:36: Cultural Osmosis: Pre-Viewing Discussion of Lawrence of Arabia
14:07: Original Trailer for Lawrence of Arabia
17:03: The Verdict: Post-Viewing Discussion of Lawrence of Arabia
57:43: Outro and Next Week's Movie

Notes and Links

—Movie Reviewed: Lawrence of Arabia (dir. David Lean, Columbia, 1962)
—Articles Mentioned and Resources: Review by Roger Ebert, rogerebert.com; Review by Bosley CrowtherNY Times; Review by Andrew SarrisThe Village Voice; "The True Story of Lawrence of Arabia," Scott Anderson, Smithsonian Magazine; David Lean's notes on editing Lawrence of Arabia, davidlean.com.
—The Music Box Theatre is one of America's great movie houses, and aptly nicknamed "Chicago's Year-Round Film Festival." Check it out and support the theater here.
—Read The Unenthusiastic Critic in prose form at unaffiliatedcritic.com.
Email us, or follow us on Twitter and Facebook. (Suggestions of movies to watch for future episodes are very welcome.)
—"Warm Duck Shuffle" by Arne Huseby is licensed under CC BY 3.0.

The Unaffiliated Critic

Michael G. McDunnah is a freelance writer, a recovering lit major, a pop-culture junkie, and an unaffiliated critic. He lives in Chicago.

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One thought on “LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (1962)

  1. My 70mm viewing of "Lawrence of Arabia" was the 1989 re-release that restored the film to nearly its full length, after a couple of decades when only truncated versions were being distributed. You and Ebert are right that it needs to be experienced on a big screen to be fully appreciated.

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